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Hot Dogs


     Supporting agility dogs with specialist lifetime cover

Contents

Dogs Can Die in Hot Cars
Kennel Club Guidance to Show Secretaries regarding leaving dogs in hot cars.
Exercise Induced Hyperthermia
Not much is known about this disorder except that it is common among highly driven dogs, particularly Border Collies. Mary Whorton looked into this condition, and this is what she discovered.
photo cred: Jenny Germaine The Five Second Rule
We all know the dangers of leaving your dog in a car in the summer heat, but did you know outdoor activities in the sun can sometimes be equally dangerous? Unlike people, dogs can't sweat so they can succumb to heat stroke much quicker than we would. Something as innocuous as walking the dog when it is too hot can be dangerous. Fortunately The Mirror newspaper has publicised a tip which is well worth remembering.
Heat Stroke
In his experience as a veterinarian and a working dog trainer/handler, Dr. Henry de Boer has attended to far more cases of heat stroke in the spring or fall than he did during the summer months. Many people, however, drop their guard during other seasons, which can lead to a possible disaster.
Heat Stroke Revisited
In his experience as a veterinarian and a working dog trainer/handler, Dr. Henry de Boer has attended to far more cases of heat stroke in the spring or fall than he did during the summer months. Most people are conscious of the risks and predisposing causes of heat stroke in the summer and take appropriate precautions. Many people, however, drop their guard during other seasons, which can lead to a possible disaster. Heat stroke is most likely to occur when we are less conscientious about how heat, muscular exertion and confinement can affect our dogs.
Heat Stroke Survival Guide
In simple terms, heatstroke occurs when a dog loses its natural ability to regulate its body temperature. Dogs don't sweat all over their bodies the way humans do. Canine body temperature is primarily regulated through respiration (i.e.panting). If a dog's respiratory tract cannot evacuate heat quickly enough, heatstroke can occur. Robert Newman, a recognised authority on American animal law, explains about heatstroke in dogs and what you can do about this life-threatening and often fatal problem.

Hot Weather Warning!
When the temperature soars and it feels like 85 degrees in the shade, don't forget your dog. You may be able to stay cool in a T-shirt and shorts, but your dog can't change into something cool. Common sense and a few simple steps can save their lives and make hot weather competing worth the trip. (07/07/01)

Kool Aids
Keep your dogs safe from the summer sun with some new technology and some old - and a little common sense.

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